Q & A for Julia Donner (M.L. Rigdon) for writing historical Westerns

I’m happy to have Julia Donner (M.L. Rigdon) on my blog today to tell us a little about her newest novel, NO EASY STREET, the second book in her Westward Bound series.  It’s available for pre-order on Amazon now.  NO EASY STREET and AVENUE TO HEAVEN are historical Western romances, and I enjoy them every bit as much as the Regency romances she writes.  Welcome to my blog, Julia!

Thanks for inviting me! I love the Americana 1800’s era as much as the Regency period. Since I’m a horse lover, I can relive the years riding the California canyons and fire trails.  And to start off the second book in this series, there is a Goodreads giveaway for AVENUE TO HEAVEN from February 16th until the 26th!

Here’s the link for the giveaway: https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/36554481-avenue-to-heaven?from_search=true

  1. So, Julia, would you like to give us a brief idea of what NO EASY STREET is about? And what the time period of the story is?

The story takes place in 1886. It’s about a woman who is determined to make a new life for herself in Wyoming. It isn’t until she arrives at the ranch that she’s inherited that she realizes the magnitude of the task. I chose Wyoming because of its early support of suffrage, and Elsbeth immediately learns that just because a law in enacted, it doesn’t mean it’s respected.

 

  1. What was a typical day in the life of a ranch hand?

It depended on the time of year, the type and size of ranch. From what I’ve read during research, what is seen on film glosses over the incredible hardships. There was nothing romantic about it. Moving stock for grazing, branding, or driving to market was and is tiring. It required changing horses three to four times a day. One or two wranglers were needed to maintain the remuda (horses). There were specific times for castration, dipping for ticks, sometimes removing horns, the constant monitoring for injuries or illnesses of the herd, keeping an eye on newborns. After the era of open range grazing, stringing fence was a major pain. Have you ever had to dig a post hole by hand? They also had to maintain their tack, clothes, and ropes, of which there were different kinds required for each task and weather changes. One of the most blatant errors in movies is the union suit, the one-piece undergarment. It didn’t come into being until after the turn of the century.

Present day ranching is much different. In some places, such as Australia, they use small helicopters to herd. How times have changed!

 

  1. In your book, Elsbeth inherits Mr. Beresford’s ranch, but that wasn’t typical for women, was it? Even though, at the time, Wyoming treated women better than most states?

Depending on individual state law, women could inherit directly, but the estate was often managed by a man. Widows usually received only half or a third of their husband’s estate. Relatives got the rest.

In 1869, Wyoming officially became a territory. The first governor signed the Female Suffrage bill, which gave women the right to vote.

In the following year, a woman temporarily held the position of Justice of the Peace, women were empaneled for jury duty, and for the first time, a woman cast a vote.

 

  1. In your book, most ranchers had no good feelings for the Indians who lived close by. Was that typical?

It was mixed but none of them wanted tribes setting up camp. The buffalo were being eradicated to starve the indigenous people and to protect the rail tracks. It was a constant battle to curb stock loss from natural predators and ranch owners didn’t want the tribes taking stock. The general attitude was that the tribes had signed treaty agreements saying they’d stay on their reservations in exchange for provisions. Ranchers and politicians weren’t interested in the fact that treaties were never honored and still aren’t today. I can think of only one of the plains tribes that did well, for a while, the Comanche under Quanah Parker’s leadership. When he became wealthy and the tribe successful, the government broke up the reservation. I’ve not read much about the coastal tribes/nations. Some of them may have had better luck.

  1. Ezekiel Street, EZ, was taken out of school by his uncle when he was only 9 years old. What were the laws for education at the time?

I’m no expert on this subject but do know that education reform had arrived. The system was regulated by agrarian need, and it still dominates our system today, even though students are not needed as they were in the past.  Farm families were usually large since there was so much work to be done. It’s doubtful anything was ever done about a child being kept home to work. The needs of the farm came first, but students were expected to attend school until they could pass an eighth grade test. One that I wonder if the majority of our high school students today could pass. One day while working in my aunt’s museum, I picked up one of the McGuffy readers. A spelling list for third graders had prestidigitation, prodigious, prevaricator.

 

  1. Elsbeth is a seamstress in your story. Could a woman support herself that way?  What other occupations were open for women back then?

We have forgotten that prior to mid-nineteen hundred, a widow could support an entire family with one job. People were also more frugal. Nothing was wasted. Clothes, tools, equipment, everything that didn’t melt or spoil in the heat lasted longer.

Historically, women, especially widows, could and had to do just about everything. They had to be stubborn and persistent to survive or achieve a dream. If they didn’t want to go through the hassle of maintaining their gender, some pretended to be men. (Calamity Jane Canary) Women sometimes participated in battle by dressing like a man, recorded as far back as the Revolutionary War.

A female took a great risk traveling without an escort, either a man or a maid—

not a female friend. That could be construed as two unsuitable women in company and fair game. A maid put a different connotation it. A mother traveling with a brood of kids could expect to be treated with respect.

Here’s the link to pre-order NO EASY STREET:https://www.amazon.com/Easy-Street-Westward-Bound-Book-ebook/dp/B07NLFHX2G/ref=sr_1_15?crid=5OHORPHY2LYH&keywords=julia+donner&qid=1549977336&s=books&sprefix=julia+donner%2Cstripbooks%2C157&sr=1-15

 

Blurb:

Startling circumstances catapult Elsbeth Soderberg from her sedate life as a seamstress in Illinois to Wyoming, where she must cope with a new life on a cattle ranch and reconcile her fascination for a reclusive neighbor and his precocious daughter. Elsbeth must quickly learn how to adapt to the challenges of an untamed territory on the verge of statehood—one where women will have the right to vote, but where many men still think of women as inferior.

Author links:

Website http://www.MLRigdon.com

https://www.bookbub.com/authors/julia-donner

https://www.facebook.com/Julia-Donner-697165363688218/timeline

Follow on Twitter @RigdonML

Blog: https://historyfanforever.wordpress.com/

Excerpt:

Chapter 1

“I’ve inherited what, Mr. Rayburn?”

The lawyer adjusted his spectacles and peered at the documents in his hand. He raised his eyebrows as he used a forefinger to skim down the page. “A ranch, Miss Soderberg, a rather substantial piece of property, outside of…ah, here it is. Near Laramie in Wyoming territory.”

Elsbeth stared at him, a scrupulously neat man behind his fancy desk, so different from the town’s grubby miners, teamsters, and wharf workers. “Begging your pardon, but you’ve not called me here to suspend my employment with your wife?”

He looked at her strangely, a combination of confusion with a hint of unsettling evasiveness. She’d spent a sleepless night waging a battle over whether or not to respond to this appointment. People who had dealings with lawyers and bankers were not her sort of folks. They were her customers. Rarely, if ever, was there fraternization with those who considered her little more than a servant.

“Mr. Rayburn, I’d assumed you asked me here to end my employment as your wife’s seamstress. Or that I’d done something to displease her.”

“No, not at all, Miss Soderberg. It is we at Holstein and Rayburn who hope to continue as your representatives. You understand, of course, that the late Mr. Henry B. Beresford was our initial client and continues as such until all of his estate is settled on you.”

With her mind swept clean by this improbable news, her voice came out in a whisper. “Sir, I have no idea who this Beresford person is.”

“That is not at issue. You have been clearly identified as his heir. Mr. Beresford must have known you or a family member of yours. He mentions nothing in the will itself as to how you are connected or related. It has also been established that he has no other living heirs.”

Her head in a fog, she sat and blinked at the glint of his spectacles and expectant expression. His office smelled of lemon oil and books. A gleaming, brass-encased clock bonged the hour of two. The furnishings were costly. This was no fly-by-night affair. Holstein and Rayburn, attorneys-at-law, represented or associated with the most influential people in Galena. Back in the day, they hobnobbed with the likes of the Washburns and even President Grant when he was in town.

Mr. Rayburn cleared his throat. “Miss Soderberg, I realize that this must come as startling news, but it is all quite legal. The estate includes twenty-three thousand in cash, some railway stock, Chicago utilities, the substantial property holding in Wyoming, and part ownership of a nearby ranch. And more.”

“Two properties?” she murmured on a shaky exhale.

“You are a very wealthy woman, much more so than anyone in Galena. You might consider purchasing the mansion that recently came up for sale on Prospect.”

She knew the one he meant. It had a ballroom, a spectacular view, and a carriage house larger than the Myerson residence where she rented out two rooms.

This was too much. She was a simple woman, an aging spinster. She had no one, scraped out a living sewing for others. She dressed well because she sewed beautifully and had a knack for style. Stylish or not, she’d passed thirty last year and no man had ever showed much interest. A few elderly gentlemen had tried to reel her in but she’d politely avoided their attention. She might be lonely but would rather live independently than spend the last half of her life taking care of someone forty years older.

“Miss Soderberg?”

“Yes, Mr. Rayburn. I beg your pardon, but I’m still reeling.”

“I assure you that there is no cause for concern. All of the firm’s expenses have been taken care of by the estate. If you wish, we could see to the sale of the properties in Wyoming, but I do advise keeping the stocks and other investments.”

Mr. Rayburn jumped to his feet when Elsbeth stood. “I shall need time to consider all of this. It’s rather alarming.”

The attorney walked her to the door and opened it with a flourish. It was as if she had stepped through a portal into another world. Jim Edmonds, who clerked for the firm, immediately got to his feet when she came through. Had he been this attentive when she arrived? So accustomed to being ignored, she hadn’t noticed.

In a matter of hours, her life completely changed.

 

 

Chapter 2

Standing on a high hill above town, Elsbeth looked down at a world that looked the same but had radically altered for her. When she’d stood in the same spot this morning, she’d used the view to calm anxiety before the appointment with the lawyer. Below, the Galena River wove through the verdant valley. Businesses and homes had been built on both sides of its banks, now swollen from winter melt. Spring’s lush vegetation congested the countryside. Trees blossomed and sprouted tender, new leaves. The air smelled brisk and green.

She’d always found comfort from the view at the corner of High and Prospect Streets. It was why she again climbed the long flight of steps up the hillside from Main Street to look down on the place of her birth and reconcile the emotional ghosts of an unhappy past. When she’d been born, Galena had been a boomtown, a thriving city made wealthy by the lead in its veins. Now, she could see its glory waning. The War Between the States ended two decades ago. The abundant minerals that fed the conflagration and Galena’s commerce were becoming scarce, the demand tapered off to a fraction of what it had been. The wide river that had carried a constant stream of riverboats had begun to shrink from silt created by the runoff from surrounding farmlands. Without dredging, it would dwindle and fade, perhaps even disappear to a trickle in the future.

A shiver of anticipation skated down her arms. It was time for something new, perhaps even adventurous. Since the appointment with the lawyer, she entertained that idea with hope.

The clatter of approaching horses shifted her attention. A team of white-socked bays pulled a surrey up Prospect Street’s steep slope, where elegant stone and brick mansions rose up to the sky in stately grandeur. Elsbeth stepped closer to the wall above the flight of steps that flanked the hillside, the ones she’d just climbed to organize her thoughts.

The surrey stopped when it reached the corner. Mrs. Rayburn peered down her nose from the open-sided carriage. “Girl, when will you finish my blue poplin day frock? I need it for a garden party on Monday.”

Years of tolerating condescension and outright rudeness had conditioned her to tolerate this sort of treatment. Not all of her clients were as toplofty as Mrs. Rayburn. Some were kind and generous, understanding of her financial circumstances, paying more than necessary, or giving a gift at Christmas. Mrs. Rayburn treated most people as her inferiors. Whenever Elsbeth went to the Rayburn’s for a fitting, she pitied the household staff. The atmosphere in the house was solemn, the servants rigid with resentment.

Elsbeth winced and stepped back when Mrs. Rayburn leaned out of the carriage to poke her shoulder with the point of an unfurled parasol. “Speak up, girl!”

Umbrage pushed the words from her mouth. “I haven’t been a girl for more than a decade, Mrs. Rayburn. Furthermore, your unfinished dress will be delivered to you this afternoon. I no longer wish to have you as a client.”

As she moved to go down the steps, she heard Mrs. Rayburn give a shrill order to the footman standing on the back of the carriage. A strong arm grasped her upper arm to escort her back to Mrs. Rayburn.

Under his breath, the footman said, “Sorry, miss.”

Elsbeth had been taught from childhood to give way to her so-called betters. Bow and scrape if you wanted to find work, but the news of this morning cracked the seed of bitterness held tightly in check for too many years. She was leaving this town and her life of poverty, mistreatment, and sad memories, leaving it all behind. Today was the start of a new life. With it came a vow to never back down from a tyrant.

“Mrs. Rayburn, you will tell your man to unhand me or I will take this matter to a constable.”

A tiny, satisfied smile thinned Mrs. Rayburn’s mouth. “You are displeased because my husband scolded you for the botched work on my nephew’s christening gown. I told him about it last week, that I refuse to pay for inferior work. My husband’s clerk said you had an appointment for this morning. You may complain to him and to others all you like. You won’t be paid for the gown, and if you don’t deliver my garden party frock by the end of the day, you won’t be paid for that either.”

The horrid woman hadn’t been off the mark. When the request for an appointment at the law office arrived yesterday, Elsbeth had immediately supposed it pertained to Mrs. Rayburn’s anger about the christening gown, which had taken many days of handwork to embellish the white satin and its matching cap. Mr. Rayburn hadn’t yet told his wife that Elsbeth was now his client. But it would be all over town by nightfall.

Elsbeth twisted from the footman’s loose grip. “You had best speak to your husband. And may tell him that if you ever accost or speak to me again, I shall no longer require his services and will take them to another attorney.”

As she descended the flight of steps to Main Street, satisfaction calmed the burn of indignation, soothed the injustice of so many individuals who must bow to the vile manners of the Mrs. Rayburns of the world. Well, thank God above that she no longer had to keep silent and take it on the chin.

She calmed her turbulent emotions with plans. The cramped rooms she rented from the Myerson’s would have to be packed up, most of the items sold. Since she’d purchased the blue material for the garden frock, she would take a scissors to the lovely poplin and send the pieces in a burlap sack to Mrs. Rayburn. It was a petty and spiteful action, but years of suppressed hurts, insults, and offenses were surging to the surface. In a few weeks, she’d be making a journey to Wyoming and a much different life.

As soon as she got home, and with a tight-lipped smile, she lifted Mrs. Rayburn’s finished and carefully folded frock from its tissue paper wrapping. The shears felt heavy and cool against her palm as she hacked into the material and sliced it into shreds.

THANKS SO MUCH FOR VISITING HERE TODAY!  AND GOOD LUCK WITH YOUR BOOKS.

Mary Lou's Avenur to Heaven twitter post

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Too many book boyfriends

I think Julia Donner writes the best male characters ever!  I like ALL of her lead characters, but when I read her Regency, THE HEIRESS AND THE SPY–if I wasn’t happily married–I’d have wanted me a clone of Peregrine Asterly.  But doggone it if she didn’t just keep writing more and more wonderful men.  I didn’t see how she could ever outdo herself until I read her historical Western, AVENUE TO HEAVEN, with Jake Williams.  Drool worthy.  Her newest Regency–the 11th in the Friendship Series–is available for pre-sale now and comes out May 1st.  It has all of her usual–wonderful characters, a luscious hero, and wry humor.  So I invited her to be a guest on my blog today for a Q&A  session.  I hope you enjoy it and welcome her.

Q & A for Julia Donner, A Laird’s Promise:

  1. I never thought about being a writer until I had my two daughters and, as a surprise, my husband signed me up for a class once a week, WRITING FOR FUN AND PROFIT. He wanted me to have some fun, and he picked the perfect thing.  I fell in love with writing.  You’ve always loved to write, though, haven’t you?  When did you get started?  And what were some of the first things you wrote?

Julia: I can’t remember when I wasn’t writing. Did the typical angst poetry thing during the teens then got serious about the craft when I had to give up theater. The first thing published was an article, not my forte, but it was romantic and dramatic, about the Monterey Cypress.

  1. You grew up in Galena, IL, didn’t you? Did you develop your love of history there?  What are some of your favorite periods of history?  If you could have dinner with one historical character, who would it be?

Julia: Aunt Marie, curator of her own museum, fostered it, made history come alive. I love all history and particularly drawn to 1800’s, ancient Roman & Egyptian and especially applying those two eras to Biblical understanding. Then there’s the whole archeology aspect. I’d love a chat with Jane Austen.

  1. Your eleven Regency books are part of the Friendship series. Some writers use a setting to connect their books.  Lord and Lady Asterly help to connect yours.  I was taken by Lord Asterly before I’d finished the first chapters in THE HEIRESS AND THE SPY, and happily, he and his Elizabeth play different parts in most of your novels.  Can you explain how that works?  How does friendship hold this series together?  How are the men in your novels unusual for their time period?

Julia: Asterly has a mysterious air, and Elizabeth is crafty, a bit sly. They have insights and talents as insiders in the political/social climate and offer aid to friends. In every book of the series, an aspect of friendship is realized, sometimes discovered and then strengthened. The series came into being to honor my friends. They’ve always been there when I needed them. It’s one of life’s most precious gifts.

  1. A LAIRD’S PROMISE takes place in Scotland, for the most part. Why did you choose that for your setting?

Julia: The fascination with Scotland became visceral when I first visited. There is something about the country and people that is very like US Americans. But it’s more than that. Something almost spiritual. The setting was chosen because it fit the characters and the plot. Not a very interesting answer, but that’s why.

5.The book before this was a departure from the Regencies.  AVENUE TO HEAVEN was the first book in your new Westward Bound series.  It’s historical, too, but tells of the American west.  Did you have to do a lot of research to write about a new setting and time period?  And what prompted you to write it?

Julia: Working in my aunt’s museum was like living in that time period. A great deal of research was needed about Native American cultures, which tribe would work with the story, its warfare history and cultural aspects. So many inaccuracies about Native Americans thrive to this day that it was important to get it right. I was fortunate to be able to speak with a Lakota tribal historian and find John Stands in Timber’s book.

I was prompted to write this story for reasons too personal to list. It’s the first book I’d attempted and put away for many years after endless revisions. Readers of the rough drafts encouraged it back to life.

  1. In your blog, you’ve said that you need new challenges to keep your writing fresh, and that’s why you write other genres under M. L. Rigdon. Do you have more Regencies and historical fiction to share with us?  Please, say yes.

Julia: The next book in the regency series is To Jilt a Corinthian, released this summer.

Every book has its own atmosphere and some are a bit darker or with aspects of mystery. For a change-up, I like to make the following one brighter with more humor. Here is a partial blurb for Corinthian:

Beatrice Allardyce is too busy for something as inconsequential as marriage. And love? A waste of time when there are so many books to read and a father who needs her care. Getting caught in a compromising situation with the haughty Sir Joceyln Warfield is definitely not a part of her agenda.

😊7.  Would you like to share an excerpt from A LAIRD’S PROMISE?

How about the blurb: Secrets from the past stand between Caroline’s determination to protect her mother and the struggle to hold fast to a love society deems above her station. In childhood, she and Alisdair were inseparable, but social rules and obligation to the title he will one day inherit tear them apart. When the truth is revealed, it isn’t Caroline whose station is lesser, but Alisdair, who must regain her trust and connive to bring the only woman he will ever love back home to Scotland.

And thanks Judy/Judi for this blog interview and your unequaled support and friendship!

Thanks for visiting my blog today!

Follow M. L. Rigdon/Julia Donner on Twitter @RigdonML
Website http://www.MLRigdon.com
Blog: https://historyfanforever.wordpress.com/
https://www.facebook.com/pages/Julia-Donner
https://www.bookbub.com/authors/julia-donner

The link for A LAIRD’S PROMISE:  https://www.amazon.com/Lairds-Promise-Friendship-Book-11-ebook/dp/B07CHS3JBP/ref=sr_1_1?s=digital-text&ie=UTF8&qid=1524939361&sr=1-1

Laird3 minimized copy

 

 

Thanks Giving

I’m getting in gear for Thanksgiving.  My two sisters and cousin always come to our house.  I know–our family is pitifully small.  This year, my daughter Holly and her son Tyler can both make it, too.  Nate’s in the marines and can’t make it home until Christmas, but that’s not that far away.  So I feel especially blessed.

We’ve had so many wonderful times with friends and family this year.  Some of our dear, old friends who’d moved away have returned, and it’s like they never left.  The years didn’t diminish our friendship at all.  And as always, I have my writer friends–a true treasure–and today, I want to share my blog with a fellow writer I admire, Julia Donner.  I’ve yammered on and on about how much I love her Regency romances.  She just published a historical western romance, and I love it just as much, so I invited her here to showcase AVENUE TO HEAVEN.  Thanks for the wonderful excerpt, Julia!  I read this book and can’t recommend it enough.  (Jake is a love interest to remember).

Blurb:    When a coffin arrives on Annie Corday’s doorstep she knows who sent it—her former husband, one of Chicago’s most vicious crime lords. Desperate, she decides on a radical solution. If a man can advertise for a wife, why can’t she arrange for a bodyguard and temporary husband?

Jake Williams isn’t looking for a wife when he comes to Chicago to buy cattle but ends up roped into a loco marriage contract. And worse, he can’t stop his headlong fall into love with a woman who will eventually leave.

 

Excerpt:

Colorado

1891

 

By the time Jake returned from the barn, Annie was at the range. He quickly learned that she liked it quiet in the morning, a slow waker. He knew enough about women to not provoke her and quietly ate. The thin, fragile pancakes filled with blackberry preserves were worthy of reverent silence.

He put his plate in the dry sink and went to get his hat. He hesitated at the door, toying with the brim, while trying to judge if she was ready for conversation. He gave up worrying about it and went out.

She surprised him when she joined him on the porch. In the quiet, they watched morning’s shy light spread its warmth across the land. The sharp scents of ragweed and dew-drenched foliage permeated the air. Gentle lowing of cattle drifted up from the pastures below.

He looked over at Annie. She gazed out at the new day and glory of a Colorado summer sunrise. She no longer looked grumpy.

He tugged his hat into place and pulled a pair of gloves from his back pocket. “Thanks for breakfast, Annie. And last night. Your word is good. I haven’t eaten like that in a long time.”

Not since Mother, but he wouldn’t tell her that. No sense in giving her a swelled head.

She stared sleepily at the spectacular view. “Thank you. Will you buy a milk cow?”

“Sorry. I don’t milk cows. I can have the neighbors bring milk over twice a week.”

“Wouldn’t it be easier to have a cow?”

“Are you willing to milk it every morning and night?”

That woke her up. He wisely swallowed a laugh when she scowled. He couldn’t tell if she was annoyed about his refusal to buy the cow or the idea of getting up early to milk it.

“Very well, sir. No cow, but I was accustomed to fresh milk every day and always kept a Jersey in the barn.”

“Small yield.”

“Plenty of cream,” she shot back.

“No cow, Annie. I spent enough years as a ranch hand to have developed a snobbish attitude about milking. Farmers milk cows. Ranchers breed’em.”

She gave up the argument with a sigh and turned back to the view. Jake started to leave, got half way to the barn and came back.

“Annie, do you know how to shoot?”

“Certainly not!”

“Can you drive a team or a single hitch buggy?”

“Yes, and I can ride.”

“Well, that’s something. But you’ll have to learn how to shoot.”

She made an owlish face. “I think not.”

“Annie,” he began, careful to remove all traces of condescension from his tone, “there’s no choice. You have to learn.”

“Give me one reason why.”

“First off, it’s August. The heat draws the rattlers to the water trough and the well out back. Come September, or when the weather turns wet, they won’t be a bother.”

“Are you speaking of rattlesnakes?”

“Yes. They like the water when the heat gets bad.”

“Very well, then. I shall learn.”

“Tomorrow,” he succinctly warned.

“Why so soon?”

“Because, Annie, it’s hot and likely to stay like this for another three weeks.”

She huffed a sigh, letting him know she would do as he asked but that he’d spoiled her morning.

~~~

She suffered through her first weaponry lesson the next day. Her target was a dead tree. Jake demonstrated with a pistol, showing how easy it was for him to shoot off tiny twigs she could barely see and certainly had no interest in killing.

She took the Colt.44 from him and managed to hit everything surrounding the tree but not the tree itself. The pistol weighed too much for her wrist. His army issue revolver wobbled in her feeble grip, even when she used both hands. By the time he told her to stop, she was ready to give up and happily set the pistol on a tree stump. She hadn’t counted on his annoying determination.

He withdrew a rifle from a fringed buckskin case. “Here. This is a Remington D-Ring.”

Exasperated by yet another weapon to fuss with, she made an impatient noise. “How many guns do you have?”

“This is a rifle, not a gun.” Before she could ask, he explained. “It has to do with the interior design of the barrel.”

She huffed an aggrieved sigh and confronted the rifle. Smooth brass pegs had been hammered into the stock for decoration. The unexpected weight of it almost slipped through her fingers and toppled her to the ground. She gamely hoisted it up.

He showed her how to fit it to her shoulder. Standing behind her, he reached around and adjusted the position. She instantly lost the ability to concentrate. His entire body was wrapped around hers, huge and enveloping her within his heat. His breath brushed her cheek. When he correctly positioned her hands, his fingers felt raspy yet gentle. The solid ridge of his thigh supported her hip. The implacable wall of his torso braced her back. She tried to think about what he was saying, but his scent and heat and presence were making her head spin.

She heard his patient directions from a distance and tried to focus on his deep, whispery voice. “Squeeze it, Annie. Slow and easy. Don’t jerk on it. Just slide your finger over it. Here. I’ll show you how.”

His finger covered hers against the trigger. An explosion slammed into her head, her body rammed backward into his chest. The spot where the rifle stock fit against her shoulder felt like she’d been kicked by a horse. But there was a hole in the center of the tree.

Stepping back, he said, sounding oddly hoarse, “Now you try it without me.”

And she did, many times. She listened, forcing attention and persistence, while he explained how to load and clean the rifle. He didn’t stand closely again, but stood a little behind her, ready to support or catch her after the impact of the recoil.

At bedtime, she used a hand mirror to study the bruises on her sore shoulder, quite proud of the smudges. She could barely lift her arm, but she knew how to shoot. Not that she could hit much. The only time the tree had anything to fear was when Jake helped her to aim, but he’d only done that once. She pretended not to feel any disappointment about that, nor about the fact that Harold had yet to wire her about what was happening in Chicago.

That night she dreamed that Charles had come to the peaceful valley, vowing to keep her there forever. Jake was in Chicago at the Clark Street house, happy as a lark, soaking in the black marble tub, fully clothed.

 

https://www.amazon.com/Avenue-Heaven-Westward-Bound-Book-ebook/dp/B076HVGS98/ref=tmm_kin_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=1509530295&sr=1-1&dpID=41zH8uAUeKL&preST=_SX342_QL70_&dpSrc=detail

 

M.L Rigdon (aka Julia Donner)

Blog: https://historyfanforever.wordpress.com/

Website http://www.MLRigdon.com

https://www.bookbub.com/authors/julia-donner

https://www.facebook.com/Julia-Donner-697165363688218/timeline

 

 

 

Writing: historical AND male/female POVs

My critique partner, Mary Lou Rigdon, writes some of my all time favorite male characters, so I wondered, how does she do it? Is it different writing from a male’s POV instead of a female’s? How does she do it so well? So I asked her to share. She writes Regency romances under the pseudonym Julia Donner, and I’m happy to have her visit my blog again. She recently released her fifth novel in the Friendship Series—The Dark Earl and His Runaway. Here’s her author page:
http://www.amazon.com/Julia-Donner/e/B00J65E8TY/ref=ntt_athr_dp_pel_1.
Hope you enjoy our Q&A:

Hi Judy! Thanks for the invite.

1. You write some mighty fine, interesting male characters. So, my first question is—do you find it easier to write male or female characters? Does it make a difference? Why or why not?

One of the things that amazed me were the enthusiastic remarks from men who liked the two fantasy books written entirely in the male point of view. I never thought about the fact that I was writing outside my gender. For me, story is about character, how the character responds to everything thrown at him/her. Men respond to the visual. Women react to the emotional. These are not hard and fast rules. Some characters are a blend. Many cultural factors influence our behaviors, and I do believe that there is something in the genes, or heritage that can play a role. I like that the sexes are different. When it all boils down to a gob of grease, men and women have the same feelings—we just feel them for different reasons.

2. What fascinates you about the Regency period? It’s a lot of work to write, lots of research. Every button and fan has to be right.

Like most regency readers, I fell in love with Jane Austen. Pride and Prejudice is still my favorite book, and Persuasion is brilliant writing, a close second. I don’t mind adding period description and usually work to not go overboard. Having spent twenty-plus years in theater, creating a literary scene is set decoration and period style is costuming. Piece-o-cake.

3. What were women’s options during that period of history? They had few rights, correct? In The Dark Earl and His Runaway, Leticia can’t refuse a marriage until she’s 21? And can’t control her money until she’s older?

My impression from all that I’ve read, and I’m no expert on British law, is that the laws were written to reflect and establish the rights of men. Women exist in the law as appendages to men. Legally, women appear to exist in how they relate to men’s rights, especially in the upper class.(In Scotland, some titles could pass through the female line.) If there was a lot of money involved, trustees or the male head of household had the control, made all decisions. Some fathers were careful and made specific inheritance stipulations, but it had to be carefully drawn up. A woman’s property passed to the husband with marriage, that’s why wise parents and guardians had precise settlements documented to protect their daughters’ futures.
When it came to children, women had no rights. Men could take the children at any time. There are historical and court records of heartless, even vindictive husbands using the children to inflict pain on the maternal spouse. The occasional kind-hearted judge might be persuaded to allow the mother rare visitations.
The element of how the law benefited men and not women has been woven into every regency I’ve written and I never realized it until this interview. Interesting.

4. What was schooling/education like during that period of history? For boys? For girls? All of the “friends” respect and are loyal to Rave for protecting them when they were away at school. Please explain.

It depended on one’s place in society. There were charity schools for the lower classes, if the children didn’t have to work in fields or factories. Early education for boys in the upper classes was done by tutors or local clergy with the “living.” Sometimes the girls were allowed to sit in, but it wasn’t common. The higher up the social chain, the less likely a woman learned basic academics. A governess started the girls off in the rudiments, and then before the girl could “come-out” or be presented at court, she was sent to a seminary and trained to sing, play an instrument, learn some French and perhaps some Italian, drawing, a little geography. If the boys weren’t sent first to a school like Eton, they were tutored at home then sent to university. Many wasted the time there, but a few took education seriously, especially younger sons, who had to make their way in the world in the military, clergy, or with a diplomatic position.
In England, the “public” school is what Americans call a private school. Independent and the old public schools, like Eton, Winchester, were breeding grounds for brutality. Hazing and bullying, fagging, as they often called it. The older boys beat the young ones. In the case of the Eligibles, Ravenswold was larger than his upperclassmen. He had a group he protected from the worst of it. Although, he wouldn’t have babied his protégés. They had to learn to fight their own battles, as Sir Harry explained in The Rake and the Bishop’s Daughter. One of the things that astonished my husband while he was in the military was how much the Brits loved to fight.

5. I get the feeling from your Regency novels that the “friends” desire different marriages than the norm. They intend to be faithful to a woman they love, and they want her to share their bed. They don’t intend to take a mistress. What was the typical aristocratic marriage like?

Aristocratic marriages were businesslike, property and lineage paramount, unless funds were needed to keep the family estate afloat. A merchant’s daughter might be wed but rarely accepted socially, unless “polished.” Love had nothing to do with marriage, but that reality would make for poor book sales. After the heir and spare, the couples went their separate ways with discretion.
Also remember that Jane Austen wrote about the gentry, not the aristocracy. Her stories were more about the upper middle class with a few titles sprinkled here and there.

6. Just in a sentence or two (or three), please describe what attracted each of your couples to each other.

The Tigresse and the Raven:
Ravenswold was immediately impressed by Cassandra’s boldness and plain speaking. He had no stomach for girls or anyone who simpered. Cassandra wanted a man she could respect and a safe haven, while protecting a friend from her past.

The Heiress and the Spy:
Lord Asterly loved the image of his friend’s wife and used it to survive the horrors of war. He fell in love with Elizabeth when he finally met her. Elizabeth was intrigued by his clever mind and enchanted with his relentless pursuit.

The Rake and the Bishop’s Daughter:
Sir Harry spent his life fooling the world and bored with the game. Widow Olivia’s practical nature was not impressed by his looks and fame. He didn’t know that she’d fallen in love with him as a girl. Olivia never forgot a kindness a handsome youth had done for a clumsy girl, while Harry became jealous of that secret memory, never realizing he was jealous of himself.

The Duchess and the Duelist:
Duelist Freddy can’t resist the secretive Evangeline, an attraction that gets out of hand. Evangeline, worn down by years of lies to protect her child from his creepy uncle, gives in to her attraction to Freddy, who refuses to give up until he has her.

The Dark Earl and His Runaway:
Unbeknownst (I’ve always wanted to use that word) to Leticia, Lord Bainbridge has loved her since she was a baby. Only a lad at the time, Bainbridge took seriously their parent’s discussion to merge their properties with a cradle engagement that never became legal but was firmly seated in the boy’s mind. Leticia couldn’t understand the earl’s devotion offered just when she needed it. His chivalry won her admiration before her heart.

Okay, I’ve bugged you enough for answers. Thanks for visiting my blog and sharing your novels with us.

Mary Lou’s blog: https://historyfanforever.wordpress.com/
Webpage: http://mlrigdon.com

Mary Lou’s other series: http://www.amazon.com/M.L.-Rigdon/e/B0086UZFGA/ref=sr_ntt_srch_lnk_1?qid=1431382365&sr=1-1